Experimentations with Hugelkulture!

I struggled with how to create a permaculture landscape, so I started with my fundamental problem – the slope of my back yard! I researched gardening on slopes, which led me to swales, water collection and pretty quickly to Hugelkulture!

Hugelkulture is a great way to build soil that improves with age. So that became my project…

Swale Start - Permaculture In Action Asheville NC Hugelkulture

The photo from February shows the contour swale, which stops the flow of water, allowing it to be absorbed in to the landscape below:

  • I covered the ground with cardboard to suppress weed growth.
  • I thoroughly wetted this layer, and every layer following.
  • I collected fallen, larger tree limbs, keeping an eye out for any covered in fungus (and using these – fungi are the teeth of the forest and will speed up your decomposition.).

Swale - Permaculture In Action Asheville NC Hugelkulture

  • I used the larger tree limbs to shape the raised beds, adding smaller branches and leaves as I went.
  • After wetting my leaf and branch layer, I covered it with straw from the chicken coop (we are fortunate enough to have some city chickens, so lots of nitrogen rich straw is available to us. Without chickens, you can use household compost, food scraps or grass clippings.

Chicken Swale - Permaculture In Action Asheville NC Hugelkulture

  • I added the top soil we had removed when digging the swales and compost.
  • I seeded it heavy with Sow True Seed nitrogen fixing peas, beans, clover, vetch and winter rye.
  • I planted early season crops of beets, carrots and chards.

Plant Starts - Permaculture In Action Asheville NC Hugelkulture

  • As these plants came in over the next month, I continued planting, adding potatoes and light feeding greens.
  • I mulched the swales to build soil and mulched the beds to retain moisture (my mulch was free from a local arborist, who was cleaning up my neighbours yard and dumped all the shredded wood chips in my driveway! Most arborists are very willing to dump mulch in a neighborhood drive vs. hauling it.

Green Harvest - Permaculture In Action Asheville NC Hugelkulture

  • At this point we were eating daily from the beds and as some greens began to bolt and flower, and peas and beans matured, I collected more seeds for later plantings.
  • Moving into summer, I over seeded with a variety of fruiting, flowering and root vegetables like winter and summer squashes, tomatoes, beans, sweet potatoes, cucumbers, and a variety of peppers.
  • I harvested the early season crops.

Food Harvest - Permaculture In Action Asheville NC Hugelkulture

  • Since this was my first experience with Hugelkultur, I doubted that the first year’s yield would provide much, as I had read that in the first year, the decomposition of the wood steals much of the nitrogen from the soil. As you can probably tell from the pictures, we were pleasantly surprised!

Tree Bed - Permaculture In Action Asheville NC Hugelkulture

The last pictures show this year’s modifications to the original raised beds and the garden expansion. On the suggestion of Patricia, who is one of the teachers of the permaculture certification course at Earthaven Ecovillage, I have levelled the original beds to stop erosion, adding more organic matter and covering with compost.

I’m very pleased with the first years results and I look forward to another year of observing and interacting, while reaping the fresh, organic benefits from my new found Hugelkulture passion!

I hope to share more permaculture in action with you soon!

Geroge Brabant

 

 

 

 

 

Milpa Farming Series: Village-scale permaculture farming with Zev Friedman

Milpa Farming: Growing Staple Foods On A Village Scale In A Forest Ecosystem

The mutually beneficial "Three Sisters" crop of corn, beans and squash is actually a simplified form of milpa, which can include not just 3 but 12-20 annual plants, all grown symbiotically together

The mutually beneficial “Three Sisters” crop of corn, beans and squash is actually a simplified form of milpa, which can include not just 3 but 12-20 annual plants, all grown symbiotically together

“Milpa” is the Nahuatl word for a sophisticated and ancient form of food, medicine and fiber production still practiced in various forms by indigenous people throughout the Americas, and providing one of the best examples of truly sustainable agriculture that permaculture seeks to learn from.

Some people have heard of the mutually beneficial plantings of the Three Sisters of corn, beans and squash- this trio is actually a simplified form of milpa, which can include not just 3 but 12-20 annual plants, all grown symbiotically together.

Traditionally these crops are grown in clearings rotated through a forest ecosystem over decades and with each clearing transforming into forest agriculture after 7-15 years of annual production. This cycle enables maximum ecological diversity, sequesters carbon dioxide, creates topsoil and provides resilient and autonomous food systems.

The people who grow milpa eat an ecstatic cuisine of annual crops, forest and perennial crops and animal foods that provide high quality and diverse nutrition.

The Milpa in Bloom

Appalachian Honey-comb Milpa Permaculture Asheville NC

Learn Milpa farming at each major stage of the growing season

In this low-tech class spanning March-November 2014, you’ll get your hands and mind into each major stage of milpa food production in one warm season including:
  • making biochar (March)
  • killing covercrops (March)
  • shaping beds for irrigation and polyculture (May)
  • planting seeds and starts (May and June)
  • various nuances of managing successful polyculture balance through the summer, defending plants from predatory animals (May and June)
  • harvesting and processing yields, saving seed and storing food, and finally preparing and enjoying a feast with traditional native cooking techniques (August, October and November)

Milpa is the “fly-fishing” of farming.

Although it might take several years of practice for you to get really good at growing food this way, I think you’ll come to see how this kind of farming offers a unique path to life-giving culture. These 9 months will immerse you in the deeply gratifying subtleties of tribal-style milpa farming- learning how to read the milpa and having the confidence to respond with appropriate physical action, hoping to receive the gift of food.
apprentices in the milpa

The series includes 7 sessions, 8 days total. You’re invited to participate at one of two levels:

1) Milpa Overview-Sessions 1, 3, 4, 6 and 7
2) Milpa Intensive-Sessions 1-7

Session 1: March 22- 23-Soils- Making biochar, managing winter cover crops, setting up a a black soldier fly larvae system, starting tobacco, cotton, introduction to polyculture farming.

Session 2: Friday, May 2- Soil shaping, covercrop cutting, biochar application, first hoe-ing

Session 3: May 18 or June 1- Planting corn and squash, creating animal Protection

Session 4: June 4- Hilling Corn, planting Beans, second hoe-ing, animal Protection, mulching, stropharia
Session 5: August 4- Tie corn, cut squash vines, animal protection, huitlacoche
Session 6: October date to-be-determined- Harvest, covercrop
Session 7: November date to-be-determined- Process yields, seed selection and saving, covercrop, feast!

Cost:

Teaching milpa farming in this way is a new experiment for me. I am currently assessing expenses of running the class and will be announcing the tuition within 2 weeks. It will be very affordable. In the meantime I wanted to get the word out so you can save the dates and so I can see who is interested.

Location:

Most of the sessions will be at Earthaven Ecovillage where I live. One or two sessions might be at a milpa I tend in Asheville.More detail to come.

Like our Facebook page: facebook.com/permacultureinaction to keep up with announcements about classes, tours and courses this year.

For Life,
Zev

Zev_ big mushroom

Kudzu Camp! Experience the permaculture approach to managing this useful and maligned plant

February 22-23, Sylva, NC

You might know kudzu as the vine that will follow you home and swallow your house.

massive kudzu snapshot

Watch the video. One of the first Permaculture in Action projects was reclaiming a lot in Asheville from kudzu and transforming it into a thriving, abundant milpa crop of corn, squash, bean, sunflowers, sweet potatoes and more.

 

But for centuries it has been revered for its generous gifts of food, fiber, medicine, and more.

Kudzu flower is a delicious wild edible.

Kudzu flower is a delicious wild edible.

Join us for a weekend workshop in Sylva, NC where we will explore how to harness the zeal of the ‘zu for both human and ecological gain!  We’ll be in the beautiful mountain town of Sylva, NC (about 1 hour west of Asheville) and the fee for the workshop will include scratch-made, organic meals provided by local chef Marc Williams.

This workshop will be a hands-on learning endeavor, so come prepared to stay warm while digging and processing roots outdoors. Fear not – there is a wood stove and plenty of cozy indoor time planned as well.

Students will learn:

  • how to find, harvest, and process superior roots for their valuable medicinal and culinary starch
  • how to harvest and process vines for their strong and beautiful fibers
  • how to use kudzu root starch in cooking and healing
  • the fascinating history of use of kudzu in Asia and in the US
  • techniques for managing kudzu patches to maximize useful yields
  • how to integrate the plant into a permaculture reforestation strategy

apprentices clearing kudzu

You can read Permaculture Apprentice, Macon Foscue’s account of last year’s kudzu experience led by Zev Friedman and Justin Veazy Holt.

Cost:

$135-165 sliding scale, includes meals and optional basic accommodations for Saturday night. Some work trade opportunities available.

Contact justinveazeyholt@gmail.com for more information and to register.

New hands-on project based trainings with Permaculture in Action 2014 — get the updates

We’re responding to the feed-back we’ve heard from both participants and people interested in participating and we’re creating new, project-based hands-on training opportunities in 2014 — starting with the Kudzu Camp coming up in February.  Sign up for our free e-book and you’ll also be included on training updates, tour and event announcements.
20 Principles_cover_border

20 Principles of Permaculture puts the principles at your fingertips.  This summary of  the Permaculture principles (first identified by Bill Mollison and David Holmgrin) was developed by Patricia Allison, one of the top teachers in the Southeastern region.
We put it into a beautiful, easy-to-read format with photographs of participants and projects from the 2012 season of Permaculture in Action. (*check out the super-deluxe video by Geocore here).

 

When you get your free e-book you’ll also be signed up to receive, Skills for Thriving, our e-newsletter where we share Permaculture wisdom, snapshots of our teachers and updates about our programs.  Of course, you can always unsubscribe and your contact information is sacred to us.

 

So get your free download of 20 Principles of Permaculture now and keep in touch!
For life and In vision,
Dylan and Zev
Zev and Dylan_Pearson pavillion

How To Fund Your Permaculture Design Course!

We The Trees – How It Works

Funding Permaculture Design Course Asheville NC

WeTheTrees.com is a crowd-funding platform that allows you to create a campaign to fundraise for your own green-orientated project! This makes it perfect for reaching out to the wider community for help with a whole host of things, not to mention a Permaculture Design Course!

Maybe you want to do a PDC so you can share your skills and knowledge with a community garden. Maybe you volunteer at a CSA and want to become even more useful. Maybe you are a teacher with a school garden who wants to introduce permaculture into the curriculum. Maybe you just want improve your own homestead, but you’ll still be enhancing the lives of your friends, family and neighbours. Crowding Funding works on the principal of lots of people giving a little to make dreams come true – your community will support you!

Permaculture In Action tries to make these courses as affordable as possible, but we understand it can still feel like a large amount. WeTheTrees is a great way to ask for help with funding your PDC without being obtrusive. You can ask for any amount from $10 upwards, so maybe you only need help with half the course fee or less? The fun thing is you even get to offer creative rewards for donations received.

Alexander Meander, raised half of his tuition in the first six hours of his campaign launch and completely funded the whole PDC in 3 days. All you need is a little bit of time and some basic computer skills to create a campaign and be raising money for your Permaculture Design Course! Check out Alexander’s Campaign to get some great ideas on making your own funding successful.

Funding Permaculture Design Course Asheville NC

Remember: JAN 2nd is the last chance to sign up for the Permaculture Design Course at Earthaven Ecovillage starting Jan 9th 2014. Don’t miss out!

How Do I Sign Up? -

Click here to Register using our online Google doc

or

Email Michelle Smith at permacultureinaction.com for additional details and to register.

The Permaculture Design Course that Changed Everything

still time images

Earthaven Permaculture Design Certification course begins Jan 9.

We live in strange and interesting times.  The economy is changing, the climate is changing, and we humans as a species are in ecological “overshoot”.

Thinking about the scale of this “overshoot”—along with the cultural amnesia and consumerism that drives it—used  to drive me into a deep state of depression.  I spent years of my life lamenting the “crash course” of our species, our destructive “nature”.

Then, in 2008, I took a Permaculture Design Course (PDC) at the Ashevillage Institute, taught by Patricia Allison.  That 14-day course changed everything for me.

Dylan-2

Dylan Ryals-Hamilton: “Mine isn’t the only life that I’ve seen change during a permaculture course. Many folks have more than one brilliant “Aha!” moment during these classes.”

I began to see monumental global issues as exciting challenges of our times.  I started seeing waste streams as opportunities and unused resources, problems as solutions, home-system design as a healing art, and activism as a creative and productive community process.

My entire outlook on life shifted, and I found a sense of purpose.

In 2009 Zev Friedman and I began a teaching apprenticeship with Patricia, and we haven’t looked back since.  Five years later we are still committed to bringing affordable and accessible high quality permaculture education to our region, and to training leaders near and far to do the same.

We do it because we feel in our hearts that this is our most effective pathway to cultivating a healthy and regenerative human culture.  We do it because we love it, and we love to help others fall in Dylan Teaching Permaculture Asheville NClove with solutions too.  Mine isn’t the only life that I’ve seen change during a permaculture course.  Many folks have more than one brilliant “Aha!” moment during these classes.

A transformative experience

A PDC isn’t just a long breakdown of techniques for growing your own food and living off the grid (although that’s all a big part of it, of course).  More so, it’s a transformational experience, an Dylan Teaching Permaculture Asheville NCexploration in whole-systems thinking, a re-structuring of our approach to “problems”, a re-connection with ourselves as a keystone species in the ecosystems upon which we depend.

mycelleum mix

A PDC course is an exploration in whole-systems thinking, a re-structuring of our approach to “problems”, and more

It’s an acknowledgement of our power and of our responsibility as cultural change agents.  Above all, it’s an opportunity to connect with other like-hearted and like-minded folks who want to do great work in the world.  After all, it isn’t worth doing if it isn’t fun, and it isn’t nearly as much fun unless we can do it together, as a community.

 The most fun PDC yet!

This is why Patricia, Zev, and I are coming back together to teach a PDC at Earthaven Ecovillage this winter. I’m really looking forward to sharing this next chapter with Patricia and Zev, and with all the new faces and old friends who will be joining us.  This just might be the most fun PDC yet.  We hope you can come along for the ride!

Registration:

Click here to Register using our online Google doc

or

Email Michelle Smith at permacultureinaction.com for additional details and to register.
Class Dates

The format consists of three 4-day class sections (Thursday through Sunday), one 3-day class section (Friday through Sunday), and one 1-day site walk and design brainstorm which will be scheduled with each design group and an instructor once the class begins.  The dates are:

  • Thursday, January 9 –> Sunday, January 12
  • Thursday, January 23–> Sunday, January 26
  • Thursday, February 13 –> Sunday, February 16
  • Friday, March 14 –>Sunday, March 16
  • Snow date weekend:  Feb. 27-March 2
Cost is on a Sliding Scale $1,000-1,300:

Please believe us, we always do our absolute best to make classes affordable.  We are all doing this work because we believe in it and want to get you involved and make a life-giving difference in the world.   So if you can possibly pay higher than the bottom on the sliding scale, we are so thankful!   This cost includes 38 meals (Thursday lunch through Sunday lunch)

“Bring-a-friend” discount: and get a $75 discount off your tuition.


Fundraise your course tuition with WeTheTrees!

Announcing: Earthaven Permaculture Design Course (PDC)!

Patricia Allison, Dylan Ryals-Hamilton and Zev Friedman will co-lead a Permaculture Design Certification class this winter at Earthhaven EcoVillage beginning January 9, 2014.

PatriciaOur first gathering. Chilly April morning.  Most of us didn't know each other. Zev_ big mushroom
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

New Format, accessible to folks outside the immediate Asheville area

Since we love this stuff and we’re always trying to make it better, we have created yet a new format which we hope will be accessible to most people within a 5 hour drive of Earthaven Ecovillage (near Asheville).   This new format adds a full 2 days to our typical 14 day PDC’s (making it 16 days total).  We’ll be using this extra time in the spirit of Permaculture in Action to complete some exciting permaculture work projects at Earthaven and to take tours of successful existing permaculture sites.

As PDC student you’ll be joining a worldwide community of several million people who have gone through the same core curriculum around a diverse body of topics: from “forest agriculture” to “passive solar building” to “ponds and aquaculture” to “designing for economic yield”, “creating intentional communities” and “urban permaculture”.   The immersion in this ocean of structured new ideas creates what is often a life-changing experience, leaving you with a newfound sense of possibility, a deeper “whole systems” way of thinking about sustainable land use and life in general, and a new group of committed, intelligent, fun-loving friends and collaborators.

Add to this formula the fact that most of the class will be happening in the heart of Earthaven EcoVillage!  There will be guest teachers to jazz things up, and the tuition includes the cost of delicious organic meals the whole time!

Earthavensign Earthaven-ecovillage
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Class Dates

The format consists of three 4-day class sections (Thursday through Sunday), one 3-day class section (Friday through Sunday), and one 1-day site walk and design brainstorm which will be scheduled with each design group and an instructor once the class begins.  The dates are:

  • Thursday, January 9 –> Sunday, January 12
  • Thursday, January 23–> Sunday, January 26
  • Thursday, February 13 –> Sunday, February 16
  • Friday, March 14 –>Sunday, March 16
  • Snow date weekend:  Feb. 27-March 2
Cost is on a Sliding Scale:

Please believe us, we always do our absolute best to make classes affordable.  We are all doing this work because we believe in it and want to get you involved and make a life-giving difference in the world.   So if you can possibly pay higher than the bottom on the sliding scale, we are so thankful!   This cost includes 38 meals (Thursday lunch through Sunday lunch)

“Bring-a-friend” discount: and get a $75 discount off your tuition.

  • Early registration (November 6-December 10)  $900-1200
  • After December 10 $1,000-1,300
Work-trades:

We are offering a limited number of partial work-trade positions. Work-traders will need to have independent transportation and time available from November through December to put up fliers and do other class preparation work, as well as time in between class sessions to help on class prep work and physical site work.  Please respond to our registrar, Michelle Smith at permacultureinaction@gmail.com to learn more about work-trade opportunities

Fundraise your course tuition with WeTheTrees!

Scholarships:

We are accepting scholarship donations which we will track and offer to people who truly cannot afford to pay for the entire tuition. If you want to help someone without lots of money to get more involved in empowering themselves through permaculture, please contact us about contributing to the scholarship fund..

Registration:

Registration is open immediately. Please sign up right away to reserve your spot (there are 30 total spots). We need 20 full-paying students to make the class run, so the sooner you sign up and get your friends in, the sooner we know the class is happening.

Click here to Register using our online Google doc

or

Email Michelle Smith at permacultureinaction.com for additional details and to register.

 

 

Permaculture Design Certification course in the winter, a different kind of animal

Sap In The Roots: Slowing Down for the Winter

Aspiring Indigenous Person (AIP) Zev (right fo the fire). That's Dylan (left of the fire) with apprentices Clayton (standing) and Macon (seated far right)

Aspiring Indigenous Person (AIP) Zev (right fo the fire). That’s Dylan (left of the fire) with apprentices Clayton (standing) and Macon (seated far right)

You’ve probably noticed that we have a divorced relationship from winter in our culture, mostly caused by an economy and fractured society that demands consistent production regardless of natural cycles, and offers little sympathy or support for a life that slows down in winter. Winter is cold and snowy and bleak, and other than holiday sales it is mainly an inconvenience to be mitigated rather than a necessary part of a bio-cultural cycle to honor and enjoy.

So why do we offer our PDC course in the winter?

In many ways, it makes more sense to me than in the growing season because it’s mostly story-telling, “classroom” teaching, delivery and digestion of transformative concepts and information which in a land-based culture we have much more time for in the winter.  Of course, because this is Permaculture in Action we always include hands-on projects and even those are chosen for the season.

The indigenous winter life-style of story and dreaming

The old-time people here, the Tsalagi, spent winters in special earth-bermed long-houses (often in different valleys and with totally different building styles from their tree bark shingled summer lodges) dug into the ground, where most of their time was spent stoking the fire, eating carefully preserved foods, telling stories, and deeply dreaming like I imagine bears or firefly larvae might do.

Imagine when spring came! Imagine the feeling of re-growth and a new world budding forth, the people emerging from the ground just as the nettles and ramps and bears and maple buds did the same, ready to plant this year’s seeds in the humus of last year’s growing, now digested by the underground fire of stories and deeply transformative rest, supported by the whole community that had just spent the winter underground together.

As an aspiring indigenous person (AIP), I long to truly be owned by this place, to actually be an organ contributing to these watersheds, soils, weathers and fertility cycles, instead of just residing here as a long-term tourist.  As I live and teach the Permaculture principles and increasingly integrate a land-based lifestyle I experience moments where I feel the rythms of this temperate Great Eastern forest.  I realize that I must be paying enough attention, at least for a moment, to help  take care of the earth around me and to receive the generous suckling that the earth is always offering. In these moments my spinning mind gives up the reins for a couple stanzas and my heart kicks in, confirming that I have the choice to belong here if I let go of the modern obsession with perfection and just focus on growing beauty as a human.

Winter is a natural time for a PDCfirst class_pearson

So, a Permaculture Design Certification class in the winter is a different kind of animal than one in the warm season. We did it last year and it was great. This year with the different format, we’ll be hunkering down for 4 days at a time at Earthaven Ecovillage to enjoy the winter forest and the feeling of having, at least for a moment, a tribe with which to share stories (maybe sappy stories?) down in the roots.

Registration is open now and space is limited.

Click here to Register using our online Google doc

or

Email Michelle Smith at permacultureinaction.com for additional details and to register.

to secure your spot in this special PDC course beginning January 9, 2014.

This video will turn you into a Permaculture in Action enthusiast!

Watch this and get fantastic look at the depth of experience, knowledge, fun and connection shared and gained by the apprentices, students and instructors of Roots and Seeds 14-day training offered this past year by Permaculture in Action. (Eternal thanks to filmaker and PiA Aprrentice, Clayton Gaar of Project Nuevo Mundo!)

Permaculture Pond!

Apprentices and Students review the use of Permaculture principles for the placement, design and installation of a small pond that is part of small West Asheville homestead

  • Applying Permaculture principles in various areas of life and design
  • Designing for an economic yield
  • Natural and passive-solar building (including the longest cob bench in Asheville!)
  • Edible landscaping
  • Forest gardens
  • Water infra-structure, cisterns and rain-water catchment
  • Animals
  • Fungi
  • Hugelkulture
  • Sheet mulching
  • Ponds in several sizes for different reason
  • Erosion control
  • Hand-crafts
  • Group connecting activities
  • Cultivating a re-connected, collaborative, cooperative human culture on our planet.

We learn so much each year!

Sign up for our e-newsletter to get updates for all our trainings including the 2104 Permaculture Design Course, our Apprenticeship program, becoming a Landowner-Client, being trained as a Permaculture in Action instructor and next year’s Roots and Seeds course.  You’ll also get our free e-book: 20 Principles of Permaculture.

Pioneering Permaculture teacher, Patricia Allison, coming out of retirement for the Earthaven PDC!

Hi y’all,Patricia_arms open

Many reading this will have met me – after all, I’ve trained about half the Permaculture graduates in the area – and those of you who know me may be surprised at seeing a blog post from me. A blog post – from Patricia Allison, the known neo-Luddite!?

Well yes, a blog post. Why? Because [Creatively Use & Respond to Change] this is how I can reach you, dear readers, to make an important announcement.

I am coming out of retirement!

It may not have looked exactly like retirement, but – after actively teaching for a dozen years, and training lots of new teachers to take my place – for the last several years, I have mostly stayed home. I’ve been building my own Permaculture home system, and teaching only one PC course a year, at home [Small & Slow Solutions].

But my life and my priorities have changed.

Over these years, I have made my nest – livable if not finished home, productive forest gardens, water and power systems – such that I can now leave it under the care of others [Succession]. I have good health and a lot to share [Share the Surplus]. And I have a new awareness of the ticking clock, leading us ever closer to ecological and economic collapse.

This summer, after various talks I’ve given, people have not just been offering praise, but urging me (guilt-tripping me?) to increase my teaching work. I’m taking up that challenge [Accept Feedback]. The Great Transformation is already underway; and I think Permaculture and Consensus are necessary tools for that transformation. My teaching can help to inspire people to make the personal and collective choices necessary NOW, to create a sustainable culture for the future.

Teaching in a new format with beloved co-conspirators

So, this winter, I’m starting here, at Zone 1, my home at Medicine Wheel neighborhood in Earthaven Ecovillage [Sector & Zone Planning] with a PDC in a brand new format:  4 long weekends, with lots of hands-on learning. But the best part isn’t brand new – it’s the renewal of a teaching relationship with my beloved co-conspirators, Zev Friedman and Dylan Ryals-Hamilton.

Zev and Dylan_Pearson pavillion

The planet was blessed when they took up the challenge, as new PDC graduates, to help me teach myself out of a job [Succession].  After a couple of years of apprenticeship, training with me to teach Permaculture, they took off and flew on their own.

Zev and Dylan have become the anchors of Permaculture in Asheville — and I feel like a proud mama! But, we’ve missed teaching with each other – recognizing that each of us brings a unique flavor to the class [Respect Diversity], and that we want to give our students the full taste of Permaculture.  I’d love to share that stew with you!

This may be the sweetest PDC in history!

[Multiple Functions]  I’m envisioning lots of philosophizing by the woodstove with hot beverages in hand; trooping through the woods, shuffling thru the amazing bounty of leaves; working hard in the cold until we’ve removed all our winter layers; and fueling up again with steaming organic soups and cornbread and greens and . . .you get the picture.

Registration is open now and space is limited so please email our registrar, Michelle at permacultureinaction@gmail.com to secure your spot in this special PDC course beginning January 9, 2014.

Please come join us, or send your friends.

Blessings on your Journey,

Patricia Allison

Patricia_portrait

Patricia Allison is a Permaculture pioneer in western NC and the author of the Permaculture in Action FREE e-book 20 Principles of Permaculture.

Please visit my websites, www.patriciaallison.net and www.consensustraining.com for more information about me, and upcoming trainings [Redundancy].